Jurors hear final submissions in unlawful sexual intercourse case

FRED WILLIAMS, Accused of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor

Prosecutor Erica Kemp and defence Attorney Carlson Shurland gave their closing submissions in the unlawful sexual intercourse trial of Fred Williams in the Supreme Court Thursday morning.

Senior Justice Estelle Gray-Evans is presiding over the case.

Williams is accused of having multiple unlawful sexual intercourse acts with the minor from October 2016 to November 2016; February 2017 and in November 2017.

In his opening remarks Shurland told the six-man, three-woman jury that the facts will demonstrate that the 16-year-old boy was troubled and confused.

He explained that sometimes people judge and accuse individuals for doing things that they think they did. “People are accused without hearing or seeing proof.”

Noting that today’s society is unforgiving, Shurland asked, “why do we hate our brothers and sisters so much that all we can think of is punishing people. Once you put information out on social media, you cannot get it back.

“What you jurors come out and say the truth is, whether I like it or not I have to accept it. I cannot be mad.

“I would thank you and feel content with you, because I know that you are mature intelligent people. I know that you guys will give this case the deliberation that it would deserve.”

Shurland pointed out that the jurors never once raised their hand and ask to go home or described themselves to be in pain. He said they stuck through the trial and he, as the attorney, have no other choice than to say thank you.

“I would’ve known and feel that you’ve done what you were supposed to do by oath.”

Shurland added that he prays every morning that he would treat people how they treat him. “Sometimes you see Mrs. Kemp and I fighting in the court, but when we get outside we are very respectable to each other, it is nothing personal.”

Shurland reminded the jury that Kemp is prosecuting one side and he is defending the other side. “But when the court case is over, we both will walk out and wish each other the best.”

Shurland said he thinks about prejudice and forgiveness; he recognizes it’s hard to change one’s submission.

He requested the jury to ask God for guidance as they deliberate.

Following Shurland’s submission Gray-Evans called for a 10-minute recess.

After the recess, Kemp began her submission speaking to the Sexual Offences Act of The Bahamas.

She noted that the street definition may not be the same as what is outlined in the law.

Kemp reminded the jury that the first offence happened when the virtual plaintiff was 14 years old and the defendant was 42.

She said that the second offence occurred …

Kemp was unable to continue, as Shurland objected asking Gray-Evans if Kemp would use the word alleged.

Continuing Kemp said, “the second alleged offence occurred when the virtual plaintiff was 14 and the defendant was 43.”

Highlighting that the plaintiff was a minor and Williams was an adult, Kemp said the defendant knew at all times the plaintiff was a minor.

“Mr. Williams told Inspector Campbell the plaintiff told him he was 15. Mr. Williams told Inspector Campbell he noticed the school that the boy attended by the color of his uniform.

“To a question regarding Mr. Williams giving the plaintiff alcohol, Mr. Williams said, ‘I don’t give kids alcohol.’”

Turning to the jury box, Kemp said Williams obviously had full knowledge that the plaintiff was a minor.

She added that it doesn’t matter if force was involved, “the law is and says sexual intercourse whether with or without consent with another male is an offence.”

Kemp said a minor cannot give consent.

Recalling past incidents told by the plaintiff that happened between him and the defendant.

Kemp explained the young boy wrote a letter to his guidance counselor about what happened and it ended with a, “help me plea.”

She reminded the jury that the young boy identified the letter along with his siblings that testified in court. “The brother and mother confirmed that it was the 14-year-old’s handwriting on the letter.”

Kemp quoted a song by Whitney Houston, “I believe the children are the future, treat them well and let them lead the way.”

She explained that this doesn’t happen by exploiting them, but by giving them a sense of pride.

Kemp said, “Whitney Houston sung … let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be.”

She reminded the jurors that the 14-year-old was not laughing but came before them in tears.

Kemp pleaded with the jury to give the 14-year-old boy back his laughter.

The trial continues.

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