Alas, it is only a season!

Dear Readers,

 

Several weeks ago, I visited a city where I got caught up in a huge snowstorm.  By its conclusion, it had deposited 10 inches of white, icy delight.  Two weeks later, I visited that same city and found children outdoors riding bicycles and playing in the park.  

 

While there remained relics of ice neatly pushed to the sides of the streets, for the most part, that storm was over.  This quickly reminded me of the seasons of our lives and the haste in which they pass.

 

On Friday past, when the prorogation of the House of Assembly was announced, it became the official embarking upon a very important period in the lives of Bahamians; another opportunity to elect a government to rule our country for the next five years.  Although this is seen, by many, as a festive time of rallies, favors, speeches, gifts, promises, frolicking, wining and dining; it is, however a serious, but fleeting time.  At the end of the day (five weeks from now), it will all be over and we will be forced to live with the choices we would have made.

 

Saturday morning, I spent some time reflecting on the funeral service of my baby brother, which I attended just shy of two months ago.  I also mused about a friend, coworker and “homeboy,” who had met the same fate as my brother.  I pondered on their passion for politics and the countless discussions, disagreements, debates and arguments we would have had over the years.  

 

I recalled the anxious moments we experienced when the results of elections were read, the moans, groans and screams that were bellowed when certain names were or were not declared.  Then, I realized for all of us, especially them, it was only a season and their season for such activities was over.

 

What a sobering reality!  Everything we do has limited time and space.  I often wonder how earnestly we think about this concept.  If we are realistic about seasons, it would be reflected in our choices.  We spend a lot of time fighting about things that are trivial, fussing over issues that we should be praying about and dividing over things that do not matter in the long scheme of existence.  If we are unreal about seasons, then we tend to have a “don’t care,” cavalier attitude about the things in life.  

 

Have you ever been in a situation, and while going through it, felt as if it was the most crucial thing in your life and you did not think that you could ever bring resolve?  Fast forward five years later and you realize that the issue that you thought would be your end was actually a small thing in the grandiosity of life.  

 

Wow, the time and effort you spent trying to resolve that crisis seem so minuscule now.  Conversely, have you ever trivialized a situation or decision that continues to haunt your life?  Wow, if only you had put more time and effort into that situation!

 

Friend, become aware that you are in a season of life, which means you now have the opportunity to make a difference, to do deeds that matter, to impact lives, to help others, make informed choices, walk uprightly, live peaceably, enjoy the things around, laugh, cry, share and care … as this season will not last forever.

 

So, it is the season in the lives of Bahamians to make some very important choices.  Some people refer to it as the “silly season,” but the only silly things about it are the trite nature in which we deal with it, how we act during this time and the way we treat each other.  Indeed, it should be a time of pensive reflection, prayer and seeking, calculated meaningful decisions and intentions; but, alas, it is only a season, and it will soon be over.

 

Let us continue to live our lives in meaningful, impactful ways, treating and respecting our fellowman with dignity and respect, as we carve our steps in the cement of time. 

 Dr. Pam

 

POINT TO PONDER: What was once tall, has now become small and soon we won’t see it at all.

• Askdoctorpam is a column that appears in this journal every week. Your letters and comments are encouraged.  You may email your letters or comments to askdoctorpam, or write to Askdoctorpam P.O. Box F43736.  Dr. Pam is a Clinical Psychologist trained in all areas of mental health.

 

Published  Tuesday, April 11, 2017 

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